Pre_GI: BLASTN Hits

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Query: NC_010723:575254 Clostridium botulinum E3 str. Alaska E43, complete genome

Start: 575254, End: 601994, Length: 26741

Host Lineage: Clostridium botulinum; Clostridium; Clostridiaceae; Clostridiales; Firmicutes; Bacteria

General Information: This strain was probably isolated from salmon eggs associated with a foodborne case of botulism in Alaska, however the exact details are not available. This genus comprises about 150 metabolically diverse species of anaerobes that are ubiquitous in virtually all anoxic habitats where organic compounds are present, including soils, aquatic sediments and the intestinal tracts of animals and humans. This shape is attributed to the presence of endospores that develop under conditions unfavorable for vegetative growth and distend single cells terminally or sub-terminally. Spores germinate under conditions favorable for vegetative growth, such as anaerobiosis and presence of organic substrates. It is believed that present day Mollicutes (Eubacteria) have evolved regressively (i.e., by genome reduction) from gram-positive clostridia-like ancestors with a low GC content in DNA. This organism produces one of the most potent and deadly neurotoxins known, a botulinum toxin that prevents the release of acetylcholine at the neuromuscular junction, thereby inhibiting muscle contraction and causing paralysis. In most cases the diseased person dies of asphyxiation as a result of paralysis of chest muscles involved in breathing. The spores are heat-resistant and can survive in inadequately heated, prepared, or processed foods. Spores germinate under favorable conditions (anaerobiosis and substrate-rich environment) and bacteria start propagating very rapidly, producing the toxin.Botulinum toxin, and C. botulinum cells, has been found in a wide variety of foods, including canned ones. Almost any food that has a high pH (above 4.6) can support growth of the bacterium. Honey is the most common vehicle for infection in infants. Food poisoning through C. botulinum is the most frequent type of infection caused by this bacterium. The wound botulism that occurs when C. botulinum infects an individual via an open wound is much rarer and is very similar to tetanus disease. There are several types of botulinum toxin known (type A through type F), all of them being neurotoxic polypeptides. The most common and widely distributed are strains and serovars of C. botulinum that produce type A toxin.




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Islands with an asterisk (*) contain ribosomal proteins or RNA related elements and may indicate a False Positive Prediction!

Subject IslandStartEndLengthSubject Host DescriptionE-valueBit scoreVisual BLASTNVisual BLASTP
NC_012225:47800478008109933300Brachyspira hyodysenteriae WA1, complete genome3e-46194BLASTN svgBLASTP svg
NC_014150:29940002994000301678522786Brachyspira murdochii DSM 12563 chromosome, complete genome1e-24123BLASTN svgBLASTP svg
NC_014330:76823276823281309944868Brachyspira pilosicoli 95/1000 chromosome, complete genome4e-24121BLASTN svgBLASTP svg
NC_018607:21115812111581214532233742Brachyspira pilosicoli B2904 chromosome, complete genome2e-26129BLASTN svgBLASTP svg
NC_019908:24015772401577244617744601Brachyspira pilosicoli P43/6/78 chromosome, complete genome4e-24121BLASTN svgBLASTP svg
NC_018604:22535392253539227800524467Brachyspira pilosicoli WesB complete genome7e-29137BLASTN svgBLASTP svg
NC_012563:22030372203037222476521729Clostridium botulinum A2 str. Kyoto, complete genome2e-1075.8BLASTN svgBLASTP svg
NC_012563:32881243288124330917721054Clostridium botulinum A2 str. Kyoto, complete genome1e-24123BLASTN svgBLASTP svg
NC_010520:31205003120500313949618997Clostridium botulinum A3 str. Loch Maree, complete genome1e-1799.6BLASTN svgBLASTP svg
NC_010520:21715842171584219449022907Clostridium botulinum A3 str. Loch Maree, complete genome5e-0867.9BLASTN svgBLASTP svg
NC_010674:61596361596363966223700Clostridium botulinum B str. Eklund 17B, complete genome04193BLASTN svgBLASTP svg
NC_010674:11702641170264119243322170Clostridium botulinum B str. Eklund 17B, complete genome3e-28135BLASTN svgBLASTP svg
NC_010516:20640272064027208498120955Clostridium botulinum B1 str. Okra, complete genome2e-1075.8BLASTN svgBLASTP svg
NC_013316:23096942309694233224722554Clostridium difficile R20291, complete genome1e-1799.6BLASTN svgBLASTP svg
NC_008593:21367592136759215512718369Clostridium novyi NT, complete genome5e-1487.7BLASTN svgBLASTP svg
NC_021182:43435143435145489320543Clostridium pasteurianum BC1, complete genome2e-1695.6BLASTN svgBLASTP svg
NC_021182:40112940112942526224134Clostridium pasteurianum BC1, complete genome2e-29139BLASTN svgBLASTP svg
NC_021182:380500*38050040092720428Clostridium pasteurianum BC1, complete genome8e-0763.9BLASTN svgBLASTP svg
NC_014654:23118182311818233086219045Halanaerobium sp. 'sapolanicus' chromosome, complete genome3e-0661.9BLASTN svgBLASTP svg