Pre_GI: SWBIT SVG BLASTP

Query: NC_017347:297313 Staphylococcus aureus subsp. aureus T0131 chromosome, complete

Lineage: Staphylococcus aureus; Staphylococcus; Staphylococcaceae; Bacillales; Firmicutes; Bacteria

General Information: Staphylcocci are generally found inhabiting the skin and mucous membranes of mammals and birds. Some members of this genus can be found as human commensals and these are generally believed to have the greatest pathogenic potential in opportunistic infections. This organism is a major cause of nosocomial (hospital-acquired) and community-acquired infections. S. aureus continues to be a major cause of mortality and is responsible for a variety of infections including, boils, furuncles, styes, impetigo and other superficial skin infections in humans. Also known to cause more serious infections particularly in the chronically ill or immunocompromised. The ability to cause invasive disease is associated with persistance in the nasal cavity of a host.

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BLASTP Alignment.txt

Subject: NC_002973:72328 Listeria monocytogenes str. 4b F2365, complete genome

Lineage: Listeria monocytogenes; Listeria; Listeriaceae; Bacillales; Firmicutes; Bacteria

General Information: This strain was isolated in 1985 in California, USA, during an outbreak of listeriosis among patients with AIDS. The strain is of serotype 4b and was isolated from a cheese product that caused the outbreak. This organism, which causes listeriosis, is one of the leading causes of death from food-borne pathogens especially in pregnant women, newborns, the elderly, and immunocompromised individuals. It is found in environments such as decaying vegetable matter, sewage, water, and soil, and it can survive extremes of both temperatures (1-45 degrees C) and salt concentration marking it as an extremely dangerous food-born pathogen, especially on food that is not reheated. This organism is enteroinvasive, and utilizes an actin-based motility system by using a surface protein, ActA, that promotes actin polymerization, to spread intercellularly using the polymerized cytoskeletal protein as a "motor". There are 13 serovars associated with Listeria monocytogenes, and the serovar 4b strains are more commonly associated with invasive disease.