Pre_GI: SWBIT SVG BLASTP

Query: NC_017214:379728 Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12 chromosome, complete

Lineage: Bifidobacterium animalis; Bifidobacterium; Bifidobacteriaceae; Bifidobacteriales; Actinobacteria; Bacteria

General Information: Representatives of this genus naturally colonize the human gastrointestinal tract (GIT) and are important for establishing and maintaining homeostasis of the intestinal ecosystem to allow for normal digestion. Their presence has been associated with beneficial health effects, such as prevention of diarrhea, amelioration of lactose intolerance, or immunomodulation. The stabilizing effect on GIT microflora is attributed to the capacity of bifidobacteria to produce bacteriocins, which are bacteriostatic agents with a broad spectrum of action, and to their pH-reducing activity. Most of the ~30 known species of bifidobacteria have been isolated from the mammalian GIT, and some from the vaginal and oral cavity. All are obligate anaerobes belonging to the Actinomycetales, branch of Gram-positive bacteria with high GC content that also includes Corynebacteria, Mycobacteria, and Streptomycetes. Bifidobacterium animalis and Bifidobacterium lactis were originally considered to be separate species. Recent studies evaluating the DNA relatedness and phenotypic similarities of these species has determined that they represent a single species.

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BLASTP Alignment.txt

Subject: NC_012815:1682872 Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis DSM 10140, complete genome

Lineage: Bifidobacterium animalis; Bifidobacterium; Bifidobacteriaceae; Bifidobacteriales; Actinobacteria; Bacteria

General Information: Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis (strain DSM 10140 / JCM 10602 / LMG 18314) is an anaerobic Gram-positive lactic acid bacterium commonly found in the guts of healthy humans and has been identified in the infant gut biota, particularly in ileal, fecal, and mucosal samples. Some strains of B. animalis subsp. lactis are able to survive in the GIT, to adhere to human epithelial cells in vitro, to modify fecal flora, to modulate the host immune response, or to prevent microbial gastroenteritis and colitis.