Pre_GI: SWBIT SVG BLASTP

Query: NC_016584:593954 Desulfosporosinus orientis DSM 765 chromosome, complete genome

Lineage: Desulfosporosinus orientis; Desulfosporosinus; Peptococcaceae; Clostridiales; Firmicutes; Bacteria

General Information: Country: Singapore; Isolation: Soil at pumping station; Temp: Mesophile; Temp: 30C. The genus Desulfotomaculum, which means a sausage (shaped organism) that reduces sulfur compounds, was first described in 1965. Desulfosporosinus orientis is a strictly anaerobic, chemoorganotrophic, Gram-positive bacterium.

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BLASTP Alignment.txt

Subject: NC_004668:2762464 Enterococcus faecalis V583, complete genome

Lineage: Enterococcus faecalis; Enterococcus; Enterococcaceae; Lactobacillales; Firmicutes; Bacteria

General Information: This strain is one of the first vancomycin-resistant strains isolated. This isolate came from a blood culture derived from a chronically-infected patient in 1987 from Barnes Hospital in St. Louis, Missouri, USA. This strain was found to lack the cytolysin gene and a surface adhesin, Esp, that contributes to urinary tract infections. Mobile genetic elements make up one quarter of the genome. This genera consists of organisms typically found in the intestines of mammals, although through fecal contamination they can appear in sewage, soil, and water. They cause a number of infections that are becoming increasingly a problem due to the number of antibiotic resistance mechanisms these organisms have picked up. Both Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium cause similar diseases in humans, and are mainly distinguished by their metabolic capabilities. This opportunistic pathogen can cause urinary tract infections, bacteremia (bacteria in the blood), and infective endocarditis (inflammation of the membrane surrounding the heart), similar to infections caused by Enterococcus faecium. Hospital-acquired infections from this organism are on the rise due to the emergence of antiobiotic resistance strains. Enterococcus faecalis produces a cytolysin toxin that is encoded on various mobile genetic elements, pathogenicity islands, and conjugative plasmids. The cytolysin aids in pathogenesis, possibly by causing destruction of cells such as erythrocytes, which allows access to new nutrients for the organism.