Pre_GI: SWBIT SVG BLASTP

Query: NC_015978:352478 Lactobacillus sanfranciscensis TMW 1.1304 chromosome, complete

Lineage: Lactobacillus sanfranciscensis; Lactobacillus; Lactobacillaceae; Lactobacillales; Firmicutes; Bacteria

General Information: This is the characteristic organism in wheat sourdough. They are commonly found in the oral, vaginal, and intestinal regions of many animals. They are important industrial microbes that contribute to the production of cheese, yogurt, and other products such as fermented milks, all stemming from the production of lactic acid, which inhibits the growth of other organisms as well as lowering the pH of the food product. Industrial production requires the use of starter cultures, which are carefully cultivated, created, and maintained, which produce specific end products during fermentation that impart flavor to the final product, as well as contributing important metabolic reactions, such as the breakdown of milk proteins during cheese production. The end product of fermentation, lactic acid, is also being used as a starter molecule for complex organic molecule syntheses.

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BLASTP Alignment.txt

Subject: NC_010067:4149298 Salmonella enterica subsp. arizonae serovar 62:z4,z23:--, complete

Lineage: Salmonella enterica; Salmonella; Enterobacteriaceae; Enterobacteriales; Proteobacteria; Bacteria

General Information: This subspecies (IIIa) is usually found associated with reptiles, although contact with infected animals can result in the spread of the organism to humans or animals such as turkeys. This strain was originally isolated from a cornsnake in 1986 in Oregon, USA. Causes enteric infections. This group of Enterobactericiae have pathogenic characteristics and are one of the most common causes of enteric infections (food poisoning) worldwide. They were named after the scientist Dr. Daniel Salmon who isolated the first organism, Salmonella choleraesuis, from the intestine of a pig. The presence of several pathogenicity islands (PAIs) that encode various virulence factors allows Salmonella spp. to colonize and infect host organisms. There are two important PAIs, Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 and 2 (SPI-1 and SPI-2) that encode two different type III secretion systems for the delivery of effector molecules into the host cell that result in internalization of the bacteria which then leads to systemic spread.