Pre_GI: SWBIT SVG BLASTP

Query: NC_014029:331919 Yersinia pestis Z176003 chromosome, complete genome

Lineage: Yersinia pestis; Yersinia; Enterobacteriaceae; Enterobacteriales; Proteobacteria; Bacteria

General Information: It was isolated from a dead marmot in Tibet Autonomous Region, China. Gram-negative straight rods, sometimes approaching a spherical shape. Y.pestis is always nonmotile. It is the causative agent of plague which is primarily a disease of wild rodents. Y.pestis is transmitted among wild rodents by fleas, in which the bacteria multiply and block the esophagus and the pharynx. The fleas regurgitate the bacteria when they take their next blood meal. Bacteria are transmitted subcutaneously to humans by the bite of infected fleas, but also by air, especially during pandemics of disease. Infective flea bites produce the typical bubonic form of plague in humans.

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BLASTP Alignment.txt

Subject: NC_012962:3864000 Photorhabdus asymbiotica, complete genome

Lineage: Photorhabdus asymbiotica; Photorhabdus; Enterobacteriaceae; Enterobacteriales; Proteobacteria; Bacteria

General Information: This strain is a North American clinical isolate from human blood. Photorhabdus asymbiota, formerly Xenorhabdus luminescens, has been isolated from human wound and blood infections often in association with spider bites. This species can also be isolated from the entomopathogenic nematode Heterorhabditis indica. Photorhabdus asymbiota is divided into two subspecies, subsp. australis which contains the Australian clinical isolates and subsp. asymbiota which contains the North American isolates. Photorhabdus is currently subdivided into three species, luminescens, temperate and asymbiotica all of which have been isolated as symbionts of heterorhabditid nematodes. This organism is unusual in that it is symbiotic within one insect, and pathogenic in another, the only organism that is known to exhibit this dual phenotype.