Pre_GI: SWBIT SVG BLASTP

Query: NC_014029:2285323 Yersinia pestis Z176003 chromosome, complete genome

Lineage: Yersinia pestis; Yersinia; Enterobacteriaceae; Enterobacteriales; Proteobacteria; Bacteria

General Information: It was isolated from a dead marmot in Tibet Autonomous Region, China. Gram-negative straight rods, sometimes approaching a spherical shape. Y.pestis is always nonmotile. It is the causative agent of plague which is primarily a disease of wild rodents. Y.pestis is transmitted among wild rodents by fleas, in which the bacteria multiply and block the esophagus and the pharynx. The fleas regurgitate the bacteria when they take their next blood meal. Bacteria are transmitted subcutaneously to humans by the bite of infected fleas, but also by air, especially during pandemics of disease. Infective flea bites produce the typical bubonic form of plague in humans.

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BLASTP Alignment.txt

Subject: NC_004603:1115134 Vibrio parahaemolyticus RIMD 2210633 chromosome I, complete

Lineage: Vibrio parahaemolyticus; Vibrio; Vibrionaceae; Vibrionales; Proteobacteria; Bacteria

General Information: This is a clinical strain isolated in 1996 in Osaka, Japan. It contains a type III secretion system which may enable colonization and penetration of the host intestinal epithelial layer, and possibly lead to septicemia. The genome contains multipe chromosomal rearrangements as compared to Vibrio cholerae. The organism also produces a hemolysin (thermostable direct hemolysin - TDH) that is particular to Vibrio parahaemolyticus. This genus is abundant in marine or freshwater environments such as estuaries, brackish ponds, or coastal areas; regions that provide an important reservoir for the organism in between outbreaks of the disease. Vibrio can affect shellfish, finfish, and other marine animals and a number of species are pathogenic for humans. This species causes food poisoning (gastroenteritis) in countries that have elevated levels of seafood consumption such as Japan.