Pre_GI: SWBIT SVG BLASTP

Query: NC_013159:3858425 Saccharomonospora viridis DSM 43017, complete genome

Lineage: Saccharomonospora viridis; Saccharomonospora; Pseudonocardiaceae; Actinomycetales; Actinobacteria; Bacteria

General Information: This organism has been implicated in a range of hypersensitivity pneumonitides, including farmer's lung disease. Symptoms of the disease develop in susceptible individuals following the inhalation of spores from overheated materials such as moldy hay and bagasse, or from forced-air heating and humidification systems. Prolonged exposure to the antigens results in acute respiratory distress which may lead to irreversible lung damage. Saccharomonospora viridis DSM 43017 was isolated from Irish peat and was originally classified as Thermomonospora viridis.

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BLASTP Alignment.txt

Subject: NC_010175:3287500 Chloroflexus aurantiacus J-10-fl, complete genome

Lineage: Chloroflexus aurantiacus; Chloroflexus; Chloroflexaceae; Chloroflexales; Chloroflexi; Bacteria

General Information: Chloroflexus aurantiacus J-10-fl (DSM 635) was isolated from the Hakone hot spring area in Japan. This organism is one of the deepest branching phototrophs, and has some characteristics of both green non-sulfur and purple photosynthetic bacteria. These thermophiles live in hot springs of neutral to high pH and grow in mats, typically as the lowest layer in the mat with cyanobacteria above them, or as filamentous tendrils. The bacterium grows as a photoheterotroph and consumes the organic products the cyanobacteria produce, although it can also be photoautotrophic under anaerobic conditions and chemoorganotrophic under aerobic conditions. Like other green sulfur bacteria, the light-harvesting apparatus exists in chlorosomes, which consists of reaction centers surround by a protein-stabilized glycolipid monolayer, at the inner surface of the cytoplasmic membrane, although the reaction centers are more similar to the type II systems found in cyanobacteria than the type I systems found in green-sulfur bacteria. The multicellular filaments this organism produces are capable of gliding motility.