Pre_GI: SWBIT SVG BLASTP

Query: NC_012962:4942000 Photorhabdus asymbiotica, complete genome

Lineage: Photorhabdus asymbiotica; Photorhabdus; Enterobacteriaceae; Enterobacteriales; Proteobacteria; Bacteria

General Information: This strain is a North American clinical isolate from human blood. Photorhabdus asymbiota, formerly Xenorhabdus luminescens, has been isolated from human wound and blood infections often in association with spider bites. This species can also be isolated from the entomopathogenic nematode Heterorhabditis indica. Photorhabdus asymbiota is divided into two subspecies, subsp. australis which contains the Australian clinical isolates and subsp. asymbiota which contains the North American isolates. Photorhabdus is currently subdivided into three species, luminescens, temperate and asymbiotica all of which have been isolated as symbionts of heterorhabditid nematodes. This organism is unusual in that it is symbiotic within one insect, and pathogenic in another, the only organism that is known to exhibit this dual phenotype.

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BLASTP Alignment.txt

Subject: NC_011080:2870428 Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Newport str. SL254,

Lineage: Salmonella enterica; Salmonella; Enterobacteriaceae; Enterobacteriales; Proteobacteria; Bacteria

General Information: The SL254 strain is an MDR strain from one of two distinct lineages of the Newport serovar. Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Newport is common worldwide. Outbreak investigations and targeted studies have identified dairy cattle as the main reservoir this serotype. Antimicrobial resistance (Newport MDR-AmpC) is particularly problematic in this serotype, and the prevalence of Newport MDR-AmpC isolates from humans in the United States has increased from 0% during 1996-1997 to 26% in 2001. MDR strains have been recorded as resistant to ampicillin, chloramphenicol, streptomycin, sulphonamides and tetracycline (ACSSuT) and many of these strains show intermediate or full resistance to third-generation cephalosporins, kanamycin, potentiated sulphonamides, and gentamicin. This group of Enterobactericiae have pathogenic characteristics and are one of the most common causes of enteric infections (food poisoning) worldwide. They were named after the scientist Dr. Daniel Salmon who isolated the first organism, Salmonella choleraesuis, from the intestine of a pig. The presence of several pathogenicity islands (PAIs) that encode various virulence factors allows Salmonella spp. to colonize and infect host organisms. There are two important PAIs, Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 and 2 (SPI-1 and SPI-2) that encode two different type III secretion systems for the delivery of effector molecules into the host cell that result in internalization of the bacteria which then leads to systemic spread.