Pre_GI: SWBIT SVG BLASTP

Query: NC_011969:3627980 Bacillus cereus Q1 chromosome, complete genome

Lineage: Bacillus cereus; Bacillus; Bacillaceae; Bacillales; Firmicutes; Bacteria

General Information: Isolated from a deep-subsurface oil reservoir in the Daqing oil field in northeastern China. This strain is non-pathogenic, and has potential for industrial use. Bacillus cereus is a Gram-positive, spore-forming bacterium of the B.cereus group. It is closely related to Bacillus anthracis and Bacillus thuringiensis. Bacillus cereus is a ubiquitous soil organism and opportunistic human pathogen most commonly associated with food poisoning, causing diarrheic (late onset) or emetic (quick onset) outbreaks.

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BLASTP Alignment.txt

Subject: NC_002973:1877905 Listeria monocytogenes str. 4b F2365, complete genome

Lineage: Listeria monocytogenes; Listeria; Listeriaceae; Bacillales; Firmicutes; Bacteria

General Information: This strain was isolated in 1985 in California, USA, during an outbreak of listeriosis among patients with AIDS. The strain is of serotype 4b and was isolated from a cheese product that caused the outbreak. This organism, which causes listeriosis, is one of the leading causes of death from food-borne pathogens especially in pregnant women, newborns, the elderly, and immunocompromised individuals. It is found in environments such as decaying vegetable matter, sewage, water, and soil, and it can survive extremes of both temperatures (1-45 degrees C) and salt concentration marking it as an extremely dangerous food-born pathogen, especially on food that is not reheated. This organism is enteroinvasive, and utilizes an actin-based motility system by using a surface protein, ActA, that promotes actin polymerization, to spread intercellularly using the polymerized cytoskeletal protein as a "motor". There are 13 serovars associated with Listeria monocytogenes, and the serovar 4b strains are more commonly associated with invasive disease.