Pre_GI: SWBIT SVG BLASTP

Query: NC_011283:942594 Klebsiella pneumoniae 342 chromosome, complete genome

Lineage: Klebsiella pneumoniae; Klebsiella; Enterobacteriaceae; Enterobacteriales; Proteobacteria; Bacteria

General Information: Klebsiella pneumoniae 342 was isolated from the stem tissue of Zea mays. This strain fixes atmospheric nitrogen and may be able to provide nitrogen, in the form of ammonia, to plant cells. This organism is the most medically important organism within the genus Klebsiella. It is an environmental organism found in water, soil, and on the surface of plants. Several strains have been isolated from plant tissues and are nitrogen-fixing endophytes that may be a source of nitrogen for the plant. Other strains can become opportunistic pathogens which infect humans, and typically causes hospital-acquired infections in immunocompromised patients. Major sites of infection include the lungs, where it causes a type of pneumonia, and urinary tract infections. Klebsiella can also enter the bloodstream (bacterimia) and cause sepsis. The pathogen can also infect animals and cause inflammation of the uterus in horses as well as more generalized infections in other mammals. This organism expresses numerous pathogenicity factors, including multiple adhesins, capsular polysaccharide, siderophores, and lipopolysaccharide for the evasion of host defenses. The multiple antibiotic resistance genes carried on the chromosome inhibit efforts to clear the organism from infected patients via antibiotic use.

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BLASTP Alignment.txt

Subject: NC_007722:55558 Erythrobacter litoralis HTCC2594, complete genome

Lineage: Erythrobacter litoralis; Erythrobacter; Erythrobacteraceae; Sphingomonadales; Proteobacteria; Bacteria

General Information: This strain was collected from the Sargasso Sea at a depth of 10 meters. Phototrophic bacterium. Organisms in this aerobic phototrophic genus are found in marine environments. Members of this group produce bacteriochlorophyll a, which is normally found in anaerobic organisms. One theory to explain this is that the anoxygenic photosynthetic gene cluster was acquired by these organisms via lateral gene transfer. Although they require an organic carbon substrate for growth, they are able to supplement a significant fraction of their metabolic requirements with photosynthetically derviced energy. This species was isolated from a marine cyanobacterial mat. Although they require an organic carbon substrate for growth, they are able to supplement a significant fraction of their metabolic requirements with photosynthetically derviced energy. The presence of the carotenoids bacteriorubixanthinal and erythroxanthin sulfate give this organism a reddish color.