Pre_GI: SWBIT SVG BLASTP

Query: NC_010572:7586115 Streptomyces griseus subsp. griseus NBRC 13350, complete genome

Lineage: Streptomyces griseus; Streptomyces; Streptomycetaceae; Actinomycetales; Actinobacteria; Bacteria

General Information: Soil bacterium producing an antituberculosis agent. The characteristic earthy smell of freshly plowed soil is actually attributed to the aromatic terpenoid geosmin produced by species of Streptomyces. There are currently 364 known species of this genus, many of which are the most important industrial producers of antibiotics and other secondary metabolites of antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, and antitumor nature, as well as immunosuppressants, antihypercholesterolemics, etc. Streptomycetes are crucial in the soil environment because their diverse metabolism allows them to degrade the insoluble remains of other organisms, including recalcitrant compounds such as lignocelluloses and chitin. Streptomycetes produce both substrate and aerial mycelium. The latter shows characteristic modes of branching, and in the course of the streptomycete complex life cycle, these hyphae are partly transformed into chains of spores, which are often called conidia or arthrospores. An important feature in Streptomyces is the presence of type-I peptidoglycan in the cell walls that contains characteristic interpeptide glycine bridges. Another remarkable trait of streptomycetes is that they contain very large (~8 million base pairs which is about twice the size of most bacterial genomes) linear chromosomes with distinct telomeres. These rearrangements consist of the deletion of several hundred kilobases, often associated with the amplification of an adjacent sequence, and lead to metabolic diversity within the Streptomyces group. Sequencing of several strains of Streptomyces is aimed partly on understanding the mechanisms involved in these diversification processes.

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BLASTP Alignment.txt

Subject: NC_015848:1896660 Mycobacterium canettii CIPT 140010059, complete genome

Lineage: Mycobacterium canettii; Mycobacterium; Mycobacteriaceae; Actinomycetales; Actinobacteria; Bacteria

General Information: The Republic of Djibouti, Africa appears to be an exceptional place in terms of tuberculosis (TB) caused by Mycobacterium canettii, a highly unusual tubercle bacillus with unusual smooth colony morphology (STB) related to the M. tuberculosis complex (MTBC). M. canettii was first isolated from a 20-year-old French farmer suffering from pulmonary tuberculosis by G. Canetti in 1969. Since then, this strain has been isolated on rare occasions from patients who lived or were presumably infected in East Africa. It tends to preferentially affect children and foreigners in the Horn of Africa. M. canettii, a possible ancestor of the MTBC, is found almost exclusively in the Horn of Africa where TB is thought to have emerged about 40 000 years ago, coinciding with the expansion of human population out of Africa. The geographical restriction of M. canettii isolates and contrasting genetic diversity are characteristics compatible with a non-human reservoir. With the larger pan-genome reflecting the ancestral, wider gene pool of tubercle bacilli, their lower virulence and faster growth, especially at temperatures below 37 degrees C, plausibly reflecting broader environmental adaptability, STB strains might thus come nearer to the as-yet-unknown missing link between the obligate pathogen M. tuberculosis and environmental mycobacteria (adapted from PMIDs 20831613 and 23291586). Mycobacteria have an unusual outer membrane approximately 8nm thick, despite being considered Gram-positive. The outer membrane and the mycolic acid-arabinoglactan-peptidoglycan polymer form the cell wall, which constitutes an efficient permeability barrier in conjunction with the cell inner membrane.