Pre_GI: SWBIT SVG BLASTP

Query: NC_010162:573709 Sorangium cellulosum 'So ce 56', complete genome

Lineage: Sorangium cellulosum; Sorangium; Polyangiaceae; Myxococcales; Proteobacteria; Bacteria

General Information: Sorangium cellulosum 'So ce 56' produces a large number of bioactive compounds, such as, the antifungal soraphen and the anticancer agent epothilone. This organism, like other myxobacteria, undergoes a complex development and differentiation pathway. When cell density increases, the organism switches to "social motility" where aggregates of cells can gather together into masses termed fruiting bodies that may consist of up to 100 000 cells. The motility system is not dependent on flagella like most bacteria, but instead relies on twitching pili: short extracellular appendages that may function analogously to oars in a rowboat. The myxobacteria have proved to be a rich source of novel natural products. Sorangium cellulosum produces a number of antibacterial, antifungal and cytotoxic substances which are being studies for therapeutic applications.

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BLASTP Alignment.txt

Subject: NC_006511:4119332 Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Paratyphi A str. ATCC

Lineage: Salmonella enterica; Salmonella; Enterobacteriaceae; Enterobacteriales; Proteobacteria; Bacteria

General Information: This serovar has a narrow host range and causes a typhoid-like (paratyphoid fever) illness in humans. It is especially prevalent in southern and eastern Asia, and has been associated with some particularly virulent outbreaks. A number of isolates are increasingly antibiotic resistant. Causes enteric infections. This group of Enterobactericiae have pathogenic characteristics and are one of the most common causes of enteric infections (food poisoning) worldwide. They were named after the scientist Dr. Daniel Salmon who isolated the first organism, Salmonella choleraesuis, from the intestine of a pig. The presence of several pathogenicity islands (PAIs) that encode various virulence factors allows Salmonella spp. to colonize and infect host organisms. There are two important PAIs, Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 and 2 (SPI-1 and SPI-2) that encode two different type III secretion systems for the delivery of effector molecules into the host cell that result in internalization of the bacteria which then leads to systemic spread.