Pre_GI: SWBIT SVG BLASTP

Query: NC_010125:1651687 Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus PAl 5, complete genome

Lineage: Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus; Gluconacetobacter; Acetobacteraceae; Rhodospirillales; Proteobacteria; Bacteria

General Information: Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus strain PAL5 (ATCC 49037) was isolated from sugarcane roots in Brazil and will be used for comparative analysis. Nitrogen-fixing plant symbiont. This acid-tolerant organism is endophytic and colonizes internal plant tissues, establishing a symbiotic relationship with its host. This bacterium has been found in sugarcane, coffee, rice, tea, and other plants. The nitrogen-fixation systems of the bacterium provide the plant with essential nitrogenous compounds while the plant provides a protected environment for the bacterium to grow in. Nitrogen-fixation is important for sugarcane production, and this organism can fix nitrogen even in the presence of nitrate.

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BLASTP Alignment.txt

Subject: NC_006142:243899 Rickettsia typhi str. Wilmington, complete genome

Lineage: Rickettsia typhi; Rickettsia; Rickettsiaceae; Rickettsiales; Proteobacteria; Bacteria

General Information: This genus, like other Rickettsial organisms such as Neorickettsia and Anaplasma, is composed of obligate intracellular pathogens. The latter is composed of two organisms, Rickettsia prowazekii and Rickettsia typhi. The bacteria are transmitted via an insect, usually a tick, to a host organism, in this case humans, where they target endothelial cells and sometimes macrophages. They attach via an adhesin, rickettsial outer membrane protein A, and are internalized where they persist as cytoplasmically free organisms. Transovarial transmission (from mother to offspring) occurs in the invertebrate host. Rickettsia typhi causes murine typhus and is an obligate intracellular pathogen that infects both the flea vector and hosts such as human, rat, and mouse. In the flea vector, the bacterium penetrates the gut epithelial barrier and is found in the feces which become infective.