Pre_GI: SWBIT SVG BLASTP

Query: NC_009667:1076718 Ochrobactrum anthropi ATCC 49188 chromosome 1, complete sequence

Lineage: Ochrobactrum anthropi; Ochrobactrum; Brucellaceae; Rhizobiales; Proteobacteria; Bacteria

General Information: Soil bacterium that can cause opportunistic infections. Ochrobactrum anthropi is an opportunistic human pathogen usually causing infection in association with indwelling medical devices, such as catheters and drainage tubes. This organism and related species have also been isolated from soil, activated sludge, and plants. Ochrobactrum anthropi is a Gram-negative, anaerobic, motile bacterium. A common soil bacteria, it was originally considered as an opportunistic pathogen, causing infections in immunocompromised patients, patients with indwelling catheters or peritoneal dialysis but it is now emerging as a more and more important nosocomial pathogen. The first case of human infection was described in 1980. It has been isolated from blood, the urogenital tract, respiratory tract and eyes, and it can be part of the normal intestinal flora. It is resistant to many antibiotics, especially the beta-lactams.

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BLASTP Alignment.txt

Subject: NC_007332:878655 Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae 7448, complete genome

Lineage: Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae; Mycoplasma; Mycoplasmataceae; Mycoplasmatales; Tenericutes; Bacteria

General Information: This pathogenic strain was isolated from an infected pig in Lindoia do Sul, Santa Catarina, in Brazil. Causes enzootic pneumonia in swine. This genus currently comprizes more than 120 obligate parasitic species found in the wide spectrum of hosts, including humans, animals, insects and plants. The primary habitats of human and animal mycoplasmas are mucouse membranes of the respiratory and urogenital tracts, eyes, mammary glands and the joints. Infection that proceeds through attachment of the bacteria to the host cell via specialized surface proteins, adhesins, and subsequent invation, results in prolonged intracellular persistence that may cause lethality. Once detected in association with their eukaryotic host tissue, most of mycoplasmas can be cultivated in the absence of a host if their extremely fastidious growth requirements are met.