Pre_GI: SWBIT SVG BLASTP

Query: NC_009465:29735 Candidatus Vesicomyosocius okutanii HA, complete genome

Lineage: Calyptogena okutanii thioautotrophic gill symbiont; sulfur-oxidizing symbionts; ; sulfur-oxidizing symbionts; Proteobacteria; Bacteria

General Information: This strain was collected off Hatsushima island in Sagami Bay, Japan. Calyptogena okutanii (deep-sea clam) thioautotrophic gill symbiont. The bivalve marine species Calyptogena okutanii depends on sulfur-oxidizing symbiotic bacteria housed in its gill tissues for its sole nutritional support. The symbiont is transmitted vertically between generations via the clam's eggs. This anaerobic symbiosis oxidizes hydrogen sulfide as an energy source and fixes carbon dioxide into organic compounds.

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BLASTP Alignment.txt

Subject: NC_006085:1379370 Propionibacterium acnes KPA171202, complete genome

Lineage: Propionibacterium acnes; Propionibacterium; Propionibacteriaceae; Actinomycetales; Actinobacteria; Bacteria

General Information: Isolated from human skin. Acne causing bacterium. This bacterium is the most common gram-positive, non-spore forming, anaerobic rod encountered in clinical specimens. The causative agent of acne, it typically grows as an obligate anaerobe. Some strains are aerotolerant, but still show better growth as an anaerobe. It has the ability to produce propionic acid, as its name suggests. It also has the ability to produce catalase along with indole, nitrate, or both indole and nitrate. Propionibacterium resembles Corynebacterium in morphology and arrangement, but is non-toxigenic.It is a common resident of the pilosebaceous (hair follicle) glands of the human skin. The bacteria release lipases to digest a surplus of the skin oil, sebum, that has been produced. The combination of digestive products (fatty acids) and bacterial antigens stimulates an intense local inflammation that bursts the hair follicle. Since acne is caused in part from an infection, it can be suppressed with topical and oral antibiotics such as clindamycin, erythromycin, or tetracycline. Some other forms of therapy include chemicals that enhance skin removal or slow the production of sebum.