Pre_GI: SWBIT SVG BLASTP

Query: NC_009342:951761 Corynebacterium glutamicum R chromosome, complete genome

Lineage: Corynebacterium glutamicum; Corynebacterium; Corynebacteriaceae; Actinomycetales; Actinobacteria; Bacteria

General Information: This strain was isolated from meadow soil in Japan. Soil bacterium with industrial uses. They may be found as members of the normal microflora of humans, where these bacteria find a suitable niche in virtually every anatomic site. This organism is a well-studied soil bacterium of considerable importance in biotechnology, in particular for the fermentative production of L-amino acids for food and fodder industry. The name was originaly given for this species for its ability to produce significant quantities (>100 g per liter) of glutamic acid (glutamate), an important food enhancer that has a meaty taste and flavor. C. glutamicum is currently used commercially to produce glutamate and other amino acids (L-lysine) and compounds. The first strain of the species was isolated in 1957 by S. Kinoshita and colleagues while searching for an efficient glutamate-producer.

- Sequence; - BLASTP hit: hover for score (Low score = Light, High score = Dark);
- hypothetical protein; - cds: hover for description

BLASTP Alignment.txt

Subject: NC_002505:2537655 Vibrio cholerae O1 biovar eltor str. N16961 chromosome I, complete

Lineage: Vibrio cholerae; Vibrio; Vibrionaceae; Vibrionales; Proteobacteria; Bacteria

General Information: This is an epidemic serogroup of Vibrio cholerae isolated in 1971 in Bangladesh and is distinguished from the classical biotype due to hemolysin production. This genus is abundant in marine or freshwater environments such as estuaries, brackish ponds, or coastal areas; regions that provide an important reservoir for the organism in between outbreaks of the disease. Vibrio can affect shellfish, finfish, and other marine animals and a number of species are pathogenic for humans. Vibrio cholerae can colonize the mucosal surface of the small intestines of humans where it will cause cholera, a severe and sudden onset diarrheal disease. One famous outbreak was traced to a contaminated well in London in 1854 by John Snow, and epidemics, which can occur with extreme rapidity, are often associated with conditions of poor sanitation. The disease has a high lethality if left untreated, and millions have died over the centuries. There have been seven major pandemics between 1817 and today. Six were attributed to the classical biotype, while the 7th, which started in 1961, is associated with the El Tor biotype.