Pre_GI: SWBIT SVG BLASTP

Query: NC_008751:2774000 Desulfovibrio vulgaris subsp. vulgaris DP4, complete genome

Lineage: Desulfovibrio vulgaris; Desulfovibrio; Desulfovibrionaceae; Desulfovibrionales; Proteobacteria; Bacteria

General Information: A sulfate reducing bacterium. These organisms typically grow anaerobically, although some can tolerate oxygen, and they utilize a wide variety of electron acceptors, including sulfate, sulfur, nitrate, and nitrite. A number of toxic metals are reduced, including uranium (VI), chromium (VI) and iron (III), making these organisms of interest as bioremediators. Metal corrosion, a problem that is partly the result of the collective activity of these bacteria, produces billions of dollars in losses each year to the petroleum industry. These organisms are also responsible for the production of poisonous hydrogen sulfide gas in marine sediments and in terrestrial environments such as drilling sites for petroleum products. This species is a sulfate reducer commonly found in a variety of soil and aquatic environments.

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BLASTP Alignment.txt

Subject: NC_008563:3888232 Escherichia coli APEC O1, complete genome

Lineage: Escherichia coli; Escherichia; Enterobacteriaceae; Enterobacteriales; Proteobacteria; Bacteria

General Information: This strain (serovar O1) is an avian pathogenic strain and causes respiratory, blood, and enteric infections primarily in poultry. This organism was named for its discoverer, Theodore Escherich, and is one of the premier model organisms used in the study of bacterial genetics, physiology, and biochemistry. This enteric organism is typically present in the lower intestine of humans, where it is the dominant facultative anaerobe present, but it is only one minor constituent of the complete intestinal microflora. E. coli, is capable of causing various diseases in its host, especially when they acquire virulence traits. E. coli can cause urinary tract infections, neonatal meningitis, and many different intestinal diseases, usually by attaching to the host cell and introducing toxins that disrupt normal cellular processes.