Pre_GI: SWBIT SVG BLASTP

Query: NC_008751:2774000 Desulfovibrio vulgaris subsp. vulgaris DP4, complete genome

Lineage: Desulfovibrio vulgaris; Desulfovibrio; Desulfovibrionaceae; Desulfovibrionales; Proteobacteria; Bacteria

General Information: A sulfate reducing bacterium. These organisms typically grow anaerobically, although some can tolerate oxygen, and they utilize a wide variety of electron acceptors, including sulfate, sulfur, nitrate, and nitrite. A number of toxic metals are reduced, including uranium (VI), chromium (VI) and iron (III), making these organisms of interest as bioremediators. Metal corrosion, a problem that is partly the result of the collective activity of these bacteria, produces billions of dollars in losses each year to the petroleum industry. These organisms are also responsible for the production of poisonous hydrogen sulfide gas in marine sediments and in terrestrial environments such as drilling sites for petroleum products. This species is a sulfate reducer commonly found in a variety of soil and aquatic environments.

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BLASTP Alignment.txt

Subject: NC_008148:2053467 Rubrobacter xylanophilus DSM 9941, complete genome

Lineage: Rubrobacter xylanophilus; Rubrobacter; Rubrobacteraceae; Rubrobacterales; Actinobacteria; Bacteria

General Information: Cellulose-degrading bacterium. This genus contains two species: Rubrobacter radiotolerans and Rubrobacter xylanophilus. These two species represent the oldest lineage (deepest branch) of the Actinobacteria and are distantly related to Mycobacteria and Streptomycetes. Both species are thermophilic and exhibit high tolerance to radiation. Very little research has been done on these organisms and little is known other than their taxonomic characterization. Rubrobacter xylanophilus was isolated from a thermally polluted industrial runoff in the United Kingdom. Some strains of this species are capable of degrading hemicellulose and xylan (polymers of plant origin), and could play a significant role in the degradation of these compounds in the wood and paper industry as well as in the environment.