Pre_GI: SWBIT SVG BLASTP

Query: NC_002505:514732 Vibrio cholerae O1 biovar eltor str. N16961 chromosome I, complete

Lineage: Vibrio cholerae; Vibrio; Vibrionaceae; Vibrionales; Proteobacteria; Bacteria

General Information: This is an epidemic serogroup of Vibrio cholerae isolated in 1971 in Bangladesh and is distinguished from the classical biotype due to hemolysin production. This genus is abundant in marine or freshwater environments such as estuaries, brackish ponds, or coastal areas; regions that provide an important reservoir for the organism in between outbreaks of the disease. Vibrio can affect shellfish, finfish, and other marine animals and a number of species are pathogenic for humans. Vibrio cholerae can colonize the mucosal surface of the small intestines of humans where it will cause cholera, a severe and sudden onset diarrheal disease. One famous outbreak was traced to a contaminated well in London in 1854 by John Snow, and epidemics, which can occur with extreme rapidity, are often associated with conditions of poor sanitation. The disease has a high lethality if left untreated, and millions have died over the centuries. There have been seven major pandemics between 1817 and today. Six were attributed to the classical biotype, while the 7th, which started in 1961, is associated with the El Tor biotype.

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BLASTP Alignment.txt

Subject: NC_013961:73037 Erwinia amylovora, complete genome

Lineage: Erwinia amylovora; Erwinia; Enterobacteriaceae; Enterobacteriales; Proteobacteria; Bacteria

General Information: This bacterium is the causative agent of Fire Blight, a destructive disease of Maloid fruit trees, such as apple and pear. Outbreaks are sporadic in the Northeast, but result in serious damage to roots, blossoms, fruit, and shoots when they occur. The pathogen overwinters in cankers or in smaller limbs. During early spring, in response to both temperature increases and bud development, the bacteria multiplies and may be seen as a yellowish ooze around the perimeter of the canker. Flies and other insects are attracted to the ooze and disperse the inoculum to other trees in the orchard. This species has recently become resistant to streptomycin, an antibiotic traditionally used in its control.