Pre_GI: SWBIT SVG BLASTN

Query: NC_018497:252374 Mycoplasma genitalium M6320 chromosome, complete genome

Lineage: Mycoplasma genitalium; Mycoplasma; Mycoplasmataceae; Mycoplasmatales; Tenericutes; Bacteria

General Information: This genus currently comprizes more than 120 obligate parasitic species found in the wide spectrum of hosts, including humans, animals, insects and plants. The primary habitats of human and animal mycoplasmas are mucouse membranes of the respiratory and urogenital tracts, eyes, mammary glands and the joints. Infection that proceeds through attachment of the bacteria to the host cell via specialized surface proteins, adhesins, and subsequent invation, results in prolonged intracellular persistence that may cause lethality. Once detected in association with their eukaryotic host tissue, most of mycoplasmas can be cultivated in the absence of a host if their extremely fastidious growth requirements are met.

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BLASTN Alignment.txt

Subject: NC_007622:1842000 Staphylococcus aureus RF122, complete genome

Lineage: Staphylococcus aureus; Staphylococcus; Staphylococcaceae; Bacillales; Firmicutes; Bacteria

General Information: This strain is a common strain associated with mastitis in cattle. This organism is responsible for several hundred million dollars worth of annual economic loss to animal production each year. Staphylcocci are generally found inhabiting the skin and mucous membranes of mammals and birds. Some members of this genus can be found as human commensals and these are generally believed to have the greatest pathogenic potential in opportunistic infections. This organism is a major cause of nosocomial (hospital-acquired) and community-acquired infections. S. aureus continues to be a major cause of mortality and is responsible for a variety of infections including, boils, furuncles, styes, impetigo and other superficial skin infections in humans. Also known to cause more serious infections particularly in the chronically ill or immunocompromised. The ability to cause invasive disease is associated with persistance in the nasal cavity of a host.