Pre_GI: SWBIT SVG BLASTN

Query: NC_017246:528825 Brucella melitensis M5-90 chromosome chromosome I, complete

Lineage: Brucella melitensis; Brucella; Brucellaceae; Rhizobiales; Proteobacteria; Bacteria

General Information: They are highly infectious, and can be spread through contact with infected animal products or through the air, making them a potential bioterrorism agent. Once the organism has entered the body, it can become intracellular, and enter the blood and lymphatic regions, multiplying inside phagocytes before eventually causing bacteremia (spread of bacteria through the blood). Virulence may depend on a type IV secretion system which may promote intracellular growth by secreting important effector molecules. This organism is a facultative intracellular bacteria that causes abortion in wild and domestic animals, usually goats or sheep, and undulant fever in humans. Brucellosis is a major health problem in the Mediterranean region and parts of Asia, Africa, and Latin America, where it causes severe economic losses. The disease is transmitted to humans by nonpasteurized milk and milk products or by direct contact with infected animals or carcasses.

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BLASTN Alignment.txt

Subject: NC_002695:2769387 Escherichia coli O157:H7 str. Sakai, complete genome

Lineage: Escherichia coli; Escherichia; Enterobacteriaceae; Enterobacteriales; Proteobacteria; Bacteria

General Information: This strain of O157:H7 was isolated in a 1997 outbreak in Sakai, Japan. This organism was named for its discoverer, Theodore Escherich, and is one of the premier model organisms used in the study of bacterial genetics, physiology, and biochemistry. This enteric organism is typically present in the lower intestine of humans, where it is the dominant facultative anaerobe present, but it is only one minor constituent of the complete intestinal microflora. E. coli, is capable of causing various diseases in its host, especially when they acquire virulence traits. E. coli can cause urinary tract infections, neonatal meningitis, and many different intestinal diseases, usually by attaching to the host cell and introducing toxins that disrupt normal cellular processes.