Pre_GI: SWBIT SVG BLASTN

Query: NC_017214:379728 Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12 chromosome, complete

Lineage: Bifidobacterium animalis; Bifidobacterium; Bifidobacteriaceae; Bifidobacteriales; Actinobacteria; Bacteria

General Information: Representatives of this genus naturally colonize the human gastrointestinal tract (GIT) and are important for establishing and maintaining homeostasis of the intestinal ecosystem to allow for normal digestion. Their presence has been associated with beneficial health effects, such as prevention of diarrhea, amelioration of lactose intolerance, or immunomodulation. The stabilizing effect on GIT microflora is attributed to the capacity of bifidobacteria to produce bacteriocins, which are bacteriostatic agents with a broad spectrum of action, and to their pH-reducing activity. Most of the ~30 known species of bifidobacteria have been isolated from the mammalian GIT, and some from the vaginal and oral cavity. All are obligate anaerobes belonging to the Actinomycetales, branch of Gram-positive bacteria with high GC content that also includes Corynebacteria, Mycobacteria, and Streptomycetes. Bifidobacterium animalis and Bifidobacterium lactis were originally considered to be separate species. Recent studies evaluating the DNA relatedness and phenotypic similarities of these species has determined that they represent a single species.

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BLASTN Alignment.txt

Subject: NC_015957:10505870 Streptomyces violaceusniger Tu 4113 chromosome, complete genome

Lineage: Streptomyces violaceusniger; Streptomyces; Streptomycetaceae; Actinomycetales; Actinobacteria; Bacteria

General Information: Environment: Soil, Terrestrial; Temp: Mesophile. Streptomyces violaceusniger 16S rRNA gene clade form a gray aerial spore mass and a grayish-yellow substrate mycelium on oatmeal agar, and produce aerial hyphae that differentiate into spiral chains of rugose ornamented spores. The characteristic earthy smell of freshly plowed soil is actually attributed to the aromatic terpenoid geosmin produced by species of Streptomyces. There are currently 364 known species of this genus, many of which are the most important industrial producers of antibiotics and other secondary metabolites of antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, and antitumor nature, as well as immunosuppressants, antihypercholesterolemics, etc. Streptomycetes are crucial in the soil environment because their diverse metabolism allows them to degrade the insoluble remains of other organisms, including recalcitrant compounds such as lignocelluloses and chitin.