Pre_GI: SWBIT SVG BLASTN

Query: NC_016894:2809125 Acetobacterium woodii DSM 1030 chromosome, complete genome

Lineage: Acetobacterium woodii; Acetobacterium; Eubacteriaceae; Clostridiales; Firmicutes; Bacteria

General Information: Acetobacterium woodii is a Gram positive, motile, strict anaerobic, acetogenic bacterium, that relies on Na+ as coupling ion in bioenergetic reactions. The organism can use a wide range of substrates, such as sugars, alcohols, methoxylated aromatic acids or C1 compounds. Electrons derived from these electron donors are used in the Wood-Ljungdahl-pathway where the organism fixes CO2 and produces acetate. The pathway of CO2-fixation is coupled to energy conservation via a chemiosmotic mechanism, one enzyme that seems to be involved is the Rnf complex. The produced Na+ gradient can be used to drive ATP-synthesis or flagella rotation. The ATP synthase is a member of the F1FO class of enzymes and has an unusual hybrid rotor. Can use alternative electron acceptors like the lignin degradation product caffeate.

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BLASTN Alignment.txt

Subject: NC_009668:1591290 Ochrobactrum anthropi ATCC 49188 chromosome 2, complete sequence

Lineage: Ochrobactrum anthropi; Ochrobactrum; Brucellaceae; Rhizobiales; Proteobacteria; Bacteria

General Information: Soil bacterium that can cause opportunistic infections. Ochrobactrum anthropi is an opportunistic human pathogen usually causing infection in association with indwelling medical devices, such as catheters and drainage tubes. This organism and related species have also been isolated from soil, activated sludge, and plants. Ochrobactrum anthropi is a Gram-negative, anaerobic, motile bacterium. A common soil bacteria, it was originally considered as an opportunistic pathogen, causing infections in immunocompromised patients, patients with indwelling catheters or peritoneal dialysis but it is now emerging as a more and more important nosocomial pathogen. The first case of human infection was described in 1980. It has been isolated from blood, the urogenital tract, respiratory tract and eyes, and it can be part of the normal intestinal flora. It is resistant to many antibiotics, especially the beta-lactams.