Pre_GI: SWBIT SVG BLASTN

Query: NC_014966:638355 Vibrio vulnificus MO6-24/O chromosome II, complete sequence

Lineage: Vibrio vulnificus; Vibrio; Vibrionaceae; Vibrionales; Proteobacteria; Bacteria

General Information: This genus is abundant in marine or freshwater environments such as estuaries, brackish ponds, or coastal areas; regions that provide an important reservoir for the organism in between outbreaks of the disease. Vibrio can affect shellfish, finfish, and other marine animals and a number of species are pathogenic for humans. Organisms of this species are opportunistic pathogens that can attack immunocompromised patients and causes gastroenteritis (inflammation of mucous membranes of stomach and intestine), wound infections, and primary septicemia (spread of the organism through the blood). This organism is the major cause of death from eating raw oysters, especially in people with liver damage. It only affects humans and other primates.

- Sequence; - BLASTN hit (Low score = Light, High score = Dark)
- hypothetical protein; - cds: hover for description

BLASTN Alignment.txt

Subject: NC_010159:259695 Yersinia pestis Angola, complete genome

Lineage: Yersinia pestis; Yersinia; Enterobacteriaceae; Enterobacteriales; Proteobacteria; Bacteria

General Information: This strain was isolated prior to 1985 and belongs to the antiqua biovar. It can ferment rhamnonse and melibiose which is a property usually associated with Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. Strain Angola belongs to a group of atypical Yersinia pestis strains with genotypic similarities that are intermediate between Y. pestis and Y. pseudotuberuclosis strains. Genotypic studies indicate that strain Angola is the oldest Y. pestis strain analyzed to date. It carries three plasmids that are similar to other Y. pestis plasmids but have aberrant sizes. The critical virulence factor, the V antigen, is different than that encoded by typical strains of Y. pestis and there is a deletion that affects the F1 operon. Strain Angola has been shown to be virulent by aerosol in mice.