Pre_GI: SWBIT SVG BLASTN

Query: NC_012659:678289 Bacillus anthracis str. A0248, complete genome

Lineage: Bacillus anthracis; Bacillus; Bacillaceae; Bacillales; Firmicutes; Bacteria

General Information: This strain (96-10355; K1256) is a human isolated from USA. This organism was the first to be shown to cause disease by Dr. Robert Koch, leading to the formulation of Koch's postulates, which were verified by Dr. Louis Pasteur (the organism, isolated from sick animals, was grown in the laboratory and then used to infect healthy animals and make them sick). This organism was also the first for which an attenuated strain was developed as a vaccine. Herbivorous animals become infected with the organism when they ingest spores from the soil whereas humans become infected when they come into contact with a contaminated animal. Anthrax is not transmitted due to person-to-person contact. The three forms of the disease reflect the sites of infection which include cutaneous (skin), pulmonary (lung), and intestinal. Pulmonary and intestinal infections are often fatal if left untreated. Spores are taken up by macrophages and become internalized into phagolysozomes (membranous compartment) whereupon germination initiates. Bacteria are released into the bloodstream once the infected macrophage lyses whereupon they rapidly multiply, spreading throughout the circulatory and lymphatic systems, a process that results in septic shock, respiratory distress and organ failure. The spores of this pathogen have been used as a terror weapon.

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BLASTN Alignment.txt

Subject: NC_009848:161373 Bacillus pumilus SAFR-032, complete genome

Lineage: Bacillus pumilus; Bacillus; Bacillaceae; Bacillales; Firmicutes; Bacteria

General Information: Bacillus pumilus SAFR-032 was isolated from the Spacecraft Assembly Facility at NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, USA and produces spores highly resistant to UV radiation. A ubiquitous soil organism. Bacillus pumilus is a naturally occurring, ubiquitous soil microorganism. Commonly found in a variety of food commodities, some strains have developed an increased tolerance to gamma irradiation. This bacterium colonizes the root zone of some plants, where it inhibits soil-borne fungal diseases and nematodes. It is also undergoing evaluation for commercial production of cellulase, an enzyme used for conversion of cellulolytic materials to soluble sugars or solvents.