Pre_GI: SWBIT SVG BLASTN

Query: NC_011916:467106 Caulobacter crescentus NA1000 chromosome, complete genome

Lineage: Caulobacter vibrioides; Caulobacter; Caulobacteraceae; Caulobacterales; Proteobacteria; Bacteria

General Information: Caulobacter crescentus NA1000 is a spontaneous mutant derivative of C. crescentus strain CB15. It is used by labs worldwide because it can easily be synchronized, allowing for studies of the bacterial cell cycle. Caulobacter vibroides, also known as Caulobacter crescentus, inhabits aquatic environments and plays an important part in biogeochemical cycling of organic nutrients. This bacterium undergoes an unusual developmental cycle in which a swarming motile cell becomes a stalked cell that is attached to a solid surface. The stalked cell then undergoes asymmetric cell division and produces one flagellated motile daughter cell and one stalked daughter cell. Thus, the asymmetric processes in this organism provide useful models for differentiation and development. This organism also contains a number of energy-dependent transport system, presumably enabling growth in the substrate-sparse aquatic environments that it lives in.

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BLASTN Alignment.txt

Subject: NC_010067:807129 Salmonella enterica subsp. arizonae serovar 62:z4,z23:--, complete

Lineage: Salmonella enterica; Salmonella; Enterobacteriaceae; Enterobacteriales; Proteobacteria; Bacteria

General Information: This subspecies (IIIa) is usually found associated with reptiles, although contact with infected animals can result in the spread of the organism to humans or animals such as turkeys. This strain was originally isolated from a cornsnake in 1986 in Oregon, USA. Causes enteric infections. This group of Enterobactericiae have pathogenic characteristics and are one of the most common causes of enteric infections (food poisoning) worldwide. They were named after the scientist Dr. Daniel Salmon who isolated the first organism, Salmonella choleraesuis, from the intestine of a pig. The presence of several pathogenicity islands (PAIs) that encode various virulence factors allows Salmonella spp. to colonize and infect host organisms. There are two important PAIs, Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 and 2 (SPI-1 and SPI-2) that encode two different type III secretion systems for the delivery of effector molecules into the host cell that result in internalization of the bacteria which then leads to systemic spread.