Pre_GI: SWBIT SVG BLASTN

Query: NC_011593:2504671 Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis ATCC 15697 chromosome,

Lineage: Bifidobacterium longum; Bifidobacterium; Bifidobacteriaceae; Bifidobacteriales; Actinobacteria; Bacteria

General Information: This strain was isolated from human infant feces. Representatives of this genus naturally colonize the human gastrointestinal tract (GIT) and are important for establishing and maintaining homeostasis of the intestinal ecosystem to allow for normal digestion. Their presence has been associated with beneficial health effects, such as prevention of diarrhea, amelioration of lactose intolerance, or immunomodulation. The stabilizing effect on GIT microflora is attributed to the capacity of bifidobacteria to produce bacteriocins, which are bacteriostatic agents with a broad spectrum of action, and to their pH-reducing activity. Most of the ~30 known species of bifidobacteria have been isolated from the mammalian GIT, and some from the vaginal and oral cavity. All are obligate anaerobes belonging to the Actinomycetales, branch of Gram-positive bacteria with high GC content that also includes Corynebacteria, Mycobacteria, and Streptomycetes. Bifidobacterium longum is found in adult humans and formula fed infants as a normal component of gut flora.

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BLASTN Alignment.txt

Subject: NC_010612:681544 Mycobacterium marinum M, complete genome

Lineage: Mycobacterium marinum; Mycobacterium; Mycobacteriaceae; Actinomycetales; Actinobacteria; Bacteria

General Information: This genus comprises a number of Gram-positive, acid-fast, rod-shaped aerobic bacteria and is the only member of the family Mycobacteriaceae within the order Actinomycetales. Like other closely related Actinomycetales, such as Nocardia and Corynebacterium, mycobacteria have unusually high genomic DNA GC content and are capable of producing mycolic acids as major components of their cell wall. Mycobacterium marinum is commonly found in fresh and salt water in North America. This bacterium, a close relative of M. tuberculosis, causes a tuberculosis-like disease in frogs, fish and other cold-blooded animals, and a peripheral granulomatous disease in humans. Human infections can be persistent and may lead to systemic infection and arthritis. M. marinum is photochromogenic, i.e. it produces bright yellow pigmentation (mainly beta-carotene) upon exposure to visible light. Infection is followed by a 2-8 week incubation period resulting in suppuration (pus) and organized ulcerating granulomas (tumorous lesions), predominantly localized in lymphatic and tendon sheaths, and cooler body tissues in the extremities.