Pre_GI: SWBIT SVG BLASTN

Query: NC_011244:746801 Borrelia recurrentis A1, complete genome

Lineage: Borrelia recurrentis; Borrelia; Spirochaetaceae; Spirochaetales; Spirochaetes; Bacteria

General Information: Borrelia recurrentis isolated from adult patient with louse-borne relapsing fever in Ethiopia. Borrelia recurrentis is the causative agent of louse-borne relapsing fever. Prior to World War II, this organism was responsible for large disease outbreaks with a mortality of up to 40% in much of the world. Currently this disease is limited to parts of Africa, China, and Peru. B. recurrentis is transmitted when infected human body lice (Pediculus humanus) are crushed and their fluids contaminate mucous membranes or breaks in the skin. Relapsing fever is characterized by a period of chills, fever, headache, and malaise, an asymptomatic period, followed by another episode of symptoms. This cycle of relapsing is due to changes in the surface proteins of Borrelia, which allow it to avoid detection and removal by the host immune system. This antigenic variation is the result of homologous recombination of silent proteins into an expressed locus, causing partial or complete replacement of one serotype with another.

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BLASTN Alignment.txt

Subject: NC_006348:2738425 Burkholderia mallei ATCC 23344 chromosome 1, complete sequence

Lineage: Burkholderia mallei; Burkholderia; Burkholderiaceae; Burkholderiales; Proteobacteria; Bacteria

General Information: This type strain came from a Chinese patient in Burma who had glanders in 1944. Causes glanders in horses. This organism is rarely associated with human infection, and is more commonly seen in domesticated animals such as horses, donkeys, and mules where it causes glanders, a disease first described by Aristotle. The pathogen is host-adapted and is not found in the environment outside of its host. Rapid-onset pneumonia, bacteremia (spread of the organism through the blood), pustules, and death are common outcomes during infection. No vaccine exists for this potentially dangerous organism.