Pre_GI: SWBIT SVG BLASTN

Query: NC_010322:1336231 Pseudomonas putida GB-1 chromosome, complete genome

Lineage: Pseudomonas putida; Pseudomonas; Pseudomonadaceae; Pseudomonadales; Proteobacteria; Bacteria

General Information: Pseudomonas putida strain GB-1, a fresh water, Gram-negative gamma-proteobacterium, is a genetically tractable, robust manganese (Mn) oxidizer, and as such, is an ideal model for unraveling the catalytic mechanism for, and the molecular regulation of Mn(IV) oxide production and its eventual accumulation on the cell surface at the onset of stationary phase. Since its isolation from Green Bay nearly 20 years ago by Ken Nealson’s group (then at the Center for Great Lakes Studies, Univ. Wisconsin-Milwaukee, USA), it has been the non spore-forming, model organism (along with the closely-related strain MnB1) for molecular genetic studies of Mn(II) oxidization, protein transport and biofilm formation and for biochemical studies on protein purification and Mn(III)-pyoverdine binding. Bacteria belonging to the Pseudomonas group are common inhabitants of soil and water and can also be found on the surfaces of plants and animals. Pseudomonas bacteria are found in nature in a biofilm or in planktonic form. Pseudomonas bacteria are renowned for their metabolic versatility as they can grow under a variety of growth conditions and do not need any organic growth factors. As they are metabolically versatile, and well characterized, it makes them great candidates for biocatalysis, bioremediation and other agricultural applications. Certain strains have been used in the production of bioplastics.

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BLASTN Alignment.txt

Subject: NC_014623:5350116 Stigmatella aurantiaca DW4/3-1 chromosome, complete genome

Lineage: Stigmatella aurantiaca; Stigmatella; Cystobacteraceae; Myxococcales; Proteobacteria; Bacteria

General Information: Social gliding soil bacterium. Stigmatella aurantica, commonly isolated from rotting wood and bark, is a member of a group of organisms called myxobacteria. These organisms have a complex development and differentiation life cycle. When cell density increases, the organism switches to "social motility" where aggregates of cells can gather together into masses termed fruiting bodies that may consist of up to 100,000 cells. Stigmatella aurantica produces a number of compounds, such as aurafuron A and stigmatellin, which may be important as anti-cancer agents.