Pre_GI: SWBIT SVG BLASTN

Query: NC_010001:3266561 Clostridium phytofermentans ISDg, complete genome

Lineage: Lachnoclostridium phytofermentans; Lachnoclostridium; Lachnospiraceae; Clostridiales; Firmicutes; Bacteria

General Information: Isolated from forest soil near the Quabbin Reservoir in Massachusetts, USA. This organism plays an important industrial and ecological role in the anaerobic fermentation of cellulose and produces economically significant levels of acetate and ethanol. This genus comprises about 150 metabolically diverse species of anaerobes that are ubiquitous in virtually all anoxic habitats where organic compounds are present, including soils, aquatic sediments and the intestinal tracts of animals and humans. This shape is attributed to the presence of endospores that develop under conditions unfavorable for vegetative growth and distend single cells terminally or sub-terminally. Spores germinate under conditions favorable for vegetative growth, such as anaerobiosis and presence of organic substrates. It is believed that present day Mollicutes (Eubacteria) have evolved regressively (i.e., by genome reduction) from gram-positive clostridia-like ancestors with a low GC content in DNA.

No Graph yet!

Subject: NC_007168:1705763 Staphylococcus haemolyticus JCSC1435, complete genome

Lineage: Staphylococcus haemolyticus; Staphylococcus; Staphylococcaceae; Bacillales; Firmicutes; Bacteria

General Information: Staphylococcus haemolyticus JCSC1435 was isolated from a Japanese inpatient at Juntendo Hospital, Tokyo, in 2000. This strain is a highly resistant strain which has been shown to generate spontaneous antibiotic sensitive mutants. Causes opportunistic infections in humans. Staphylcocci are generally found inhabiting the skin and mucous membranes of mammals and birds. Some members of this genus can be found as human commensals and these are generally believed to have the greatest pathogenic potential in opportunistic infections. Staphylococcus haemolyticus was originally isolated from human skin and traditionally considered to be a nonpathogenic commensal. Recently this organism has been recognized as a pathogen in animals and humans. It is known to be involved in opportunistic infections associated with the implantation of foreign bodies, paticularly in those with compromised immune systems. Resistance to multiple antibiotics has been observed in clinical isolates and it is possible S. haemolyticus could serve a donor or resistance genes to other more virulent staphlococci.