Pre_GI: SWBIT SVG BLASTN

Query: NC_009667:1076718 Ochrobactrum anthropi ATCC 49188 chromosome 1, complete sequence

Lineage: Ochrobactrum anthropi; Ochrobactrum; Brucellaceae; Rhizobiales; Proteobacteria; Bacteria

General Information: Soil bacterium that can cause opportunistic infections. Ochrobactrum anthropi is an opportunistic human pathogen usually causing infection in association with indwelling medical devices, such as catheters and drainage tubes. This organism and related species have also been isolated from soil, activated sludge, and plants. Ochrobactrum anthropi is a Gram-negative, anaerobic, motile bacterium. A common soil bacteria, it was originally considered as an opportunistic pathogen, causing infections in immunocompromised patients, patients with indwelling catheters or peritoneal dialysis but it is now emerging as a more and more important nosocomial pathogen. The first case of human infection was described in 1980. It has been isolated from blood, the urogenital tract, respiratory tract and eyes, and it can be part of the normal intestinal flora. It is resistant to many antibiotics, especially the beta-lactams.

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BLASTN Alignment.txt

Subject: NC_015571:2273503 Porphyromonas gingivalis TDC60, complete genome

Lineage: Porphyromonas gingivalis; Porphyromonas; Porphyromonadaceae; Bacteroidales; Bacteroidetes; Bacteria

General Information: This organism is associated with severe and chronic periodontal (tissues surrounding and supporting the tooth) diseases. Progression of the disease is caused by colonization by this organism in an anaerobic environment in host tissues and severe progression results in loss of the tissues supporting the tooth and eventually loss of the tooth itself. The black pigmentation characteristic of this bacterium comes from iron acquisition that does not use the typical siderophore system of other bacteria but accumulates hemin. Peptides appear to be the predominant carbon and energy source of this organism, perhaps in keeping with its ability to destroy host tissue. Oxygen tolerance systems play a part in establishment of the organism in the oral cavity, including a superoxide dismutase. Pathogenic factors include extracellular adhesins that mediate interactions with other bacteria as well as the extracellular matrix, and a host of degradative enzymes that are responsible for tissue degradation and spread of the organism including the gingipains, which are trypsin-like cysteine proteases.