Pre_GI: SWBIT SVG BLASTN

Query: NC_009667:1076718 Ochrobactrum anthropi ATCC 49188 chromosome 1, complete sequence

Lineage: Ochrobactrum anthropi; Ochrobactrum; Brucellaceae; Rhizobiales; Proteobacteria; Bacteria

General Information: Soil bacterium that can cause opportunistic infections. Ochrobactrum anthropi is an opportunistic human pathogen usually causing infection in association with indwelling medical devices, such as catheters and drainage tubes. This organism and related species have also been isolated from soil, activated sludge, and plants. Ochrobactrum anthropi is a Gram-negative, anaerobic, motile bacterium. A common soil bacteria, it was originally considered as an opportunistic pathogen, causing infections in immunocompromised patients, patients with indwelling catheters or peritoneal dialysis but it is now emerging as a more and more important nosocomial pathogen. The first case of human infection was described in 1980. It has been isolated from blood, the urogenital tract, respiratory tract and eyes, and it can be part of the normal intestinal flora. It is resistant to many antibiotics, especially the beta-lactams.

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BLASTN Alignment.txt

Subject: NC_009802:1077926 Campylobacter concisus 13826, complete genome

Lineage: Campylobacter concisus; Campylobacter; Campylobacteraceae; Campylobacterales; Proteobacteria; Bacteria

General Information: Campylobacter concisus 13826 is a gastrointestinal clinical isolate. Members of this genus are one of the most common causes of bacterial gastroenteritis (campylobacteriosis). Usually the symptoms are abdominal pain, fever, diarrhea, and cramps, but the illness can sometimes be fatal and some infected individuals develop a syndrome (Guillain-Barre) in which the nerves connecting the spinal cord to the brain are damaged. C. jejuni is the main cause of campylobacteriosis, but other species can also cause infection, including C. coli, C. upsaliensis, and C. concisus. Campylobacter concisus was first isolated from the human oral cavity in cases of gingivitis; however the role it plays in periodontal disease is unclear. This organism has also been isolated from children and immunocompromised patients with gastrointestinal disease. C. concisus is a genetically diverse species, comprised of at least four genomospecies.