Pre_GI: SWBIT SVG BLASTN

Query: NC_009667:1076718 Ochrobactrum anthropi ATCC 49188 chromosome 1, complete sequence

Lineage: Ochrobactrum anthropi; Ochrobactrum; Brucellaceae; Rhizobiales; Proteobacteria; Bacteria

General Information: Soil bacterium that can cause opportunistic infections. Ochrobactrum anthropi is an opportunistic human pathogen usually causing infection in association with indwelling medical devices, such as catheters and drainage tubes. This organism and related species have also been isolated from soil, activated sludge, and plants. Ochrobactrum anthropi is a Gram-negative, anaerobic, motile bacterium. A common soil bacteria, it was originally considered as an opportunistic pathogen, causing infections in immunocompromised patients, patients with indwelling catheters or peritoneal dialysis but it is now emerging as a more and more important nosocomial pathogen. The first case of human infection was described in 1980. It has been isolated from blood, the urogenital tract, respiratory tract and eyes, and it can be part of the normal intestinal flora. It is resistant to many antibiotics, especially the beta-lactams.

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BLASTN Alignment.txt

Subject: NC_004344:672550 Wigglesworthia glossinidia endosymbiont of Glossina brevipalpis,

Lineage: Wigglesworthia glossinidia; Wigglesworthia; Enterobacteriaceae; Enterobacteriales; Proteobacteria; Bacteria

General Information: This organism is the obligate endosymbiont for the tsetse fly Glossina brevipalpis. As Wigglesworthia brevipalpis resides intracellularly, the resulting co-evolution with its host over millions of years has led to a drastic reduction in the bacterium's genome size, resulting in this its inability to survive outside the host. Tsetse fly endosymbiont. This organism is the obligate endosymbiont for the tsetse fly Glossina brevipalpis, Glossina tachinoides, Glossina palpalis palpalis, and Glossina austeni. The tsetse fly is a vector for African trypanosomes, and is the main transmitter of deadly diseases in animals and humans in Africa. The fly feeds on a restricted diet, exclusively consisting of vertebrate blood, and lacks certain metabolic compounds needed for survival and reproduction. To complement this lack in nutrients, the tsetse fly relies mainly on the intracellular bacterial symbiont, Wigglesworthia glossinidia for its viability and fecundity.