Pre_GI: SWBIT SVG BLASTN

Query: NC_009617:163466 Clostridium beijerinckii NCIMB 8052 chromosome, complete genome

Lineage: Clostridium beijerinckii; Clostridium; Clostridiaceae; Clostridiales; Firmicutes; Bacteria

General Information: Solvent-producing bacterium. This genus comprises about 150 metabolically diverse species of anaerobes that are ubiquitous in virtually all anoxic habitats where organic compounds are present, including soils, aquatic sediments and the intestinal tracts of animals and humans. This shape is attributed to the presence of endospores that develop under conditions unfavorable for vegetative growth and distend single cells terminally or sub-terminally. Spores germinate under conditions favorable for vegetative growth, such as anaerobiosis and presence of organic substrates. It is believed that present day Mollicutes (Eubacteria) have evolved regressively (i.e., by genome reduction) from gram-positive clostridia-like ancestors with a low GC content in DNA. Some species are capable of producing organic solvents (acetone, ethanol, etc,), molecular hydrogen and other useful compounds. There are also species that can fix molecular nitrogen and thus are important participants in biological turnaround of nitrogen compounds in nature. This species is used to produce industrial solvents.

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BLASTN Alignment.txt

Subject: NC_009802:647901 Campylobacter concisus 13826, complete genome

Lineage: Campylobacter concisus; Campylobacter; Campylobacteraceae; Campylobacterales; Proteobacteria; Bacteria

General Information: Campylobacter concisus 13826 is a gastrointestinal clinical isolate. Members of this genus are one of the most common causes of bacterial gastroenteritis (campylobacteriosis). Usually the symptoms are abdominal pain, fever, diarrhea, and cramps, but the illness can sometimes be fatal and some infected individuals develop a syndrome (Guillain-Barre) in which the nerves connecting the spinal cord to the brain are damaged. C. jejuni is the main cause of campylobacteriosis, but other species can also cause infection, including C. coli, C. upsaliensis, and C. concisus. Campylobacter concisus was first isolated from the human oral cavity in cases of gingivitis; however the role it plays in periodontal disease is unclear. This organism has also been isolated from children and immunocompromised patients with gastrointestinal disease. C. concisus is a genetically diverse species, comprised of at least four genomospecies.