Pre_GI: SWBIT SVG BLASTN

Query: NC_009505:264963 Brucella ovis ATCC 25840 chromosome I, complete sequence

Lineage: Brucella ovis; Brucella; Brucellaceae; Rhizobiales; Proteobacteria; Bacteria

General Information: This strain was isolated from sheep tissue in Australia. Causes brucellosis in sheep. This organism specifically affects sheep, causing ovine brucellosis which results in significant economic losses. Infection by the organism can cause infertility in rams as the bacterium preferentially colonizes the genital tract, and causes inflammation of the epididymis which leads to necrotic lesions and a decrease in sperm numbers and motility. This bacterium, like other Brucella, is an intracellular pathogen that infects phagocytic cells such as macrophages. Bacterial cells produces a lipopolysaccharide that lacks O-antigen side chains, which results in a rough colony phenotype, and aids in differentiation as compared to other Brucella.

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BLASTN Alignment.txt

Subject: NC_014228:3391500 Xenorhabdus nematophila ATCC 19061, complete genome

Lineage: Xenorhabdus nematophila; Xenorhabdus; Enterobacteriaceae; Enterobacteriales; Proteobacteria; Bacteria

General Information: This genus is a group of insect pathogens which live in a mutualistic relationship with the soil nematode family, Steinernematidae. Free-living, juvenile Steinernema spp. enter insect larvae through the digestive tract. They penetrate the larvae body cavity and release Xenorhabdus spp. into the hemolymph (blood). The bacteria multiply rapidly, killing the larvae, and providing suitable nutrient conditions for the growth and reproduction of the Steinernema spp. The nematode matures and reproduces. The new juveniles reassociate with Xenorhabdus spp. and are released into the soil. Unlike Xenorhabdus bovienii, which is found in different Steinernema spp., Xenorhabdus nematophila is associated specifically with Steinernema carpocapsae and can be used as a model for studying host specificity.