Pre_GI: SWBIT SVG BLASTN

Query: NC_008369:1702885 Francisella tularensis subsp. holarctica OSU18, complete genome

Lineage: Francisella tularensis; Francisella; Francisellaceae; Thiotrichales; Proteobacteria; Bacteria

General Information: Isolated from a beaver that died of tularemia in Oklahoma in 1978. Causative agent of tularemia. This organism was first identified by Edward Francis as the causative agent of a plague-like illness that affected squirrels in Tulare county in California in the early part of the 20th century. The organism now bears his name. The disease, which has been noted throughout recorded history, can be transmitted to humans by infected ticks or deerflies, infected meat, or by aerosol, and thus is a potential bioterrorism agent. This organism has a high infectivity rate, and can invade phagocytic and nonphagocytic cells, multiplying rapidly. Once within a macrophage, the organism can escape the phagosome and live in the cytosol. It is an aquatic organism, and can be found living inside protozoans, similar to what is observed with Legionella.

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BLASTN Alignment.txt

Subject: NC_005139:2731623 Vibrio vulnificus YJ016 chromosome I, complete sequence

Lineage: Vibrio vulnificus; Vibrio; Vibrionaceae; Vibrionales; Proteobacteria; Bacteria

General Information: This is a Biotype 1 hospital isolate from Taiwan. It contains larger chromosomes and >1000 genes as compared to Vibrio cholerae and contains a conjugative plasmid, pYJ016. There are numerous virulence factors including a cytolysin, protease, capsular polysaccharide as well as iron-uptake systems encoded in the genome. This genus is abundant in marine or freshwater environments such as estuaries, brackish ponds, or coastal areas; regions that provide an important reservoir for the organism in between outbreaks of the disease. Vibrio can affect shellfish, finfish, and other marine animals and a number of species are pathogenic for humans. Organisms of this species are opportunistic pathogens that can attack immunocompromised patients and causes gastroenteritis (inflammation of mucous membranes of stomach and intestine), wound infections, and primary septicemia (spread of the organism through the blood). This organism is the major cause of death from eating raw oysters, especially in people with liver damage. It only affects humans and other primates.