Pre_GI: SWBIT SVG BLASTN

Query: NC_007492:4563981 Pseudomonas fluorescens PfO-1, complete genome

Lineage: Pseudomonas fluorescens; Pseudomonas; Pseudomonadaceae; Pseudomonadales; Proteobacteria; Bacteria

General Information: This strain was isolated from agricultural loam (sand, clay, and organic matter) soil in 1988 by Compeau et al. and is well adapted to soil environments. Bacteria belonging to the Pseudomonas group are common inhabitants of soil and water and can also be found on the surfaces of plants and animals. Pseudomonas bacteria are found in nature in a biofilm or in planktonic form. Pseudomonas bacteria are renowned for their metabolic versatility as they can grow under a variety of growth conditions and do not need any organic growth factors. This organism is a nonpathogenic saprophyte which inhabits soil, water and plant surface environments. If iron is in low supply, it produces a soluble, greenish fluorescent pigment, which is how it was named. As these environmentally versatile bacteria possess the ability to degrade (at least partially) multiple different pollutants, they are studied in their use as bioremediants.

- Sequence; - BLASTN hit (Low score = Light, High score = Dark)
- hypothetical protein; - cds: hover for description

BLASTN Alignment.txt

Subject: NC_020211:554736 Serratia marcescens WW4, complete genome

Lineage: Serratia marcescens; Serratia; Enterobacteriaceae; Enterobacteriales; Proteobacteria; Bacteria

General Information: This organism was discovered in 1819 by Bizio who named the organism after the Italian physicist Serrati. It was considered a nonpathogenic organism until late in the 20th century, although pathogenicity was noted as early as 1913. Serratia marcescens is an opportunistic human pathogen that is increasingly associated with life-threatening hospital-acquired infections. It is an environmental organism that has a broad host range, and is capable of infecting vertebrates and invertebrates, as well as plants. In humans, Serratia marcescens can cause meningitis (inflammation of the membrane surrounding the brain and spinal cord), endocarditis (inflammation of heart muscle) and pyelonephritis (inflammation of the kidneys). Many strains are resistant to multiple antibiotics. Environmental isolates are noted by production of the red pigment prodigiosin.