Pre_GI: SWBIT SVG BLASTN

Query: NC_004631:862002 Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhi Ty2, complete

Lineage: Salmonella enterica; Salmonella; Enterobacteriaceae; Enterobacteriales; Proteobacteria; Bacteria

General Information: This pathogenic strain of Salmonella typhi was isolated in the early 1970s. It contains no multidrug resistance plasmids and has been used for vaccine development. This serovar is a human-specific organism that causes the life-threatening illness Typhoid fever which is acquired by coming into contact with contaminated food or water. Annually, 17 million people are infected, with 600,000 fatalities, mostly in developing countries. It contains multiple fimbrial operons that may be used to create extracellular appendages for attachment and entry into host intestinal epithelial cells. Causes enteric infections. This group of Enterobactericiae have pathogenic characteristics and are one of the most common causes of enteric infections (food poisoning) worldwide. They were named after the scientist Dr. Daniel Salmon who isolated the first organism, Salmonella choleraesuis, from the intestine of a pig. The presence of several pathogenicity islands (PAIs) that encode various virulence factors allows Salmonella spp. to colonize and infect host organisms. There are two important PAIs, Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 and 2 (SPI-1 and SPI-2) that encode two different type III secretion systems for the delivery of effector molecules into the host cell that result in internalization of the bacteria which then leads to systemic spread.

- Sequence; - BLASTN hit (Low score = Light, High score = Dark)
- hypothetical protein; - cds: hover for description

BLASTN Alignment.txt

Subject: NC_020064:1547524 Serratia marcescens FGI94, complete genome

Lineage: Serratia marcescens; Serratia; Enterobacteriaceae; Enterobacteriales; Proteobacteria; Bacteria

General Information: This organism was discovered in 1819 by Bizio who named the organism after the Italian physicist Serrati. It was considered a nonpathogenic organism until late in the 20th century, although pathogenicity was noted as early as 1913. Serratia marcescens is an opportunistic human pathogen that is increasingly associated with life-threatening hospital-acquired infections. It is an environmental organism that has a broad host range, and is capable of infecting vertebrates and invertebrates, as well as plants. In humans, Serratia marcescens can cause meningitis (inflammation of the membrane surrounding the brain and spinal cord), endocarditis (inflammation of heart muscle) and pyelonephritis (inflammation of the kidneys). Many strains are resistant to multiple antibiotics. Environmental isolates are noted by production of the red pigment prodigiosin.