Pre_GI: SWBIT SVG BLASTN

Query: NC_004369:1051013 Corynebacterium efficiens YS-314, complete genome

Lineage: Corynebacterium efficiens; Corynebacterium; Corynebacteriaceae; Actinomycetales; Actinobacteria; Bacteria

General Information: This is the type strain of C. efficiens isolated by researchers of Ajinomoto food company from soils at Kanagawa, Japan in the late 1980's. The strain can grow and produce glutamate at temperatures above up to 45oC in contrast to C. glutamicum that is only efficient at around 30oC. This feature is very beneficial for industrial applications, because less heat removal is required in fermenters to be used for cultivation of these bacteria. Glutamate-producing bacterium. They may be found as members of the normal microflora of humans, where these bacteria find a suitable niche in virtually every anatomic site. This organism is a recently proposed new species of the genus capable of producing significant quantities of glutamic acid (glutamate), an important enhancer of taste in the food industry. It is currently used commercially to produce glutamate and other amino acids and compounds.

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BLASTN Alignment.txt

Subject: NC_009664:1195630 Kineococcus radiotolerans SRS30216, complete genome

Lineage: Kineococcus radiotolerans; Kineococcus; Kineosporiaceae; Actinomycetales; Actinobacteria; Bacteria

General Information: This organism is a coccoid bacterium originally isolated from a high-level radioactive waste cell at the Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina, USA, in 2002. Radiation-resistant bacterium. Similarly to Deinococcus radiodurans, K. radiotolerans exhibits a high degree of resistance to ionizing gamma-radiation. Cells are also highly resistant to dessication. Kineococcus-like 16S rRNA gene sequences have been reported from the Mojave desert and other arid environments where these bacteria seem to be ubiquitous. Because of its high resistance to ionizing radiation and desiccation, K. radiotolerans has potential use in applications involving in situ biodegradation of problematic organic contaminants from highly radioactive environments. Moreover, comparative functional genomic characterization of this species and other known radiotolerant bacteria such as Deinococcus radiodurans and Rubrobacter xylanophilus will shed light onto the strategies these bacteria use for survival in high radiation environments, as well as the evolutionary origins of radioresistance and their highly efficient DNA repair machinery. This organism produces an orange carotenoid-like pigment. Cell growth occurs between 11-41 degresss C, pH 5-9, and in the presence of <5% NaCl and <20% glucose. Carbohydrates and alcohols are primary growth substrates.