Pre_GI: SWBIT SVG BLASTN

Query: NC_004061:31500 Buchnera aphidicola str. Sg (Schizaphis graminum), complete genome

Lineage: Buchnera aphidicola; Buchnera; Enterobacteriaceae; Enterobacteriales; Proteobacteria; Bacteria

General Information: This strain is the symbiont of the aphid Schizaphis graminum and contains a large circular chromosome. Aphid endosymbiont. Almost all aphids contain maternally transmitted bacteriocyte cells, which themselves contain bacteria called Buchnera. The aphids live on a restricted diet (plant sap), rich in carbohydrates, but poor in nitrogenous or other essential compounds. It is believed that the Buchnera provide the essential nutrients the host lacks. Besides a nutritional co-dependence, due to a co-existence of millions of years, Buchnera have lost the ability to produce cell surface components such as lipopolysaccharides. This makes for an obligate endosymbiont relationship between host and Buchnera. Buchnera are prokaryotic cells which belong to the gamma-Proteobacteria, closely related to the Enterobacteriaceae family. Phylogenetic studies using 16S rRNA indicate that the symbiotic relationship was established around 200-250 million years ago. Since Buchnera are closely related to Escherichia coli and Haemophilus influenzae, comparative genomic studies can shed light on the evolutionary mechanisms of intracellular endosymbiosis as well as the different underlying molecular basis between organisms with parasitic behavior and symbionts.

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BLASTN Alignment.txt

Subject: NC_012778:2997 Eubacterium eligens ATCC 27750, complete genome

Lineage: Eubacterium eligens; Eubacterium; Eubacteriaceae; Clostridiales; Firmicutes; Bacteria

General Information: Eubacterium eligens ATCC 27750 is part of the normal human gut flora. This genus has been isolated as normal flora from feces, rumen, and periodontal tissue. Eubacterium spp. are thought to play a beneficial role in maintaining the normal ecology of the large intestine, in part by producing chemicals like butyric acid which act to inhibit the growth of other bacteria. These organisms are occasionally isolated from wounds and abscesses and may be an opportunistic pathogen. This genus has also been isolated from sewage and soil.