Pre_GI: BLASTN Hits

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Query: NC_010723:3133302 Clostridium botulinum E3 str. Alaska E43, complete genome

Start: 3133302, End: 3153532, Length: 20231

Host Lineage: Clostridium botulinum; Clostridium; Clostridiaceae; Clostridiales; Firmicutes; Bacteria

General Information: This strain was probably isolated from salmon eggs associated with a foodborne case of botulism in Alaska, however the exact details are not available. This genus comprises about 150 metabolically diverse species of anaerobes that are ubiquitous in virtually all anoxic habitats where organic compounds are present, including soils, aquatic sediments and the intestinal tracts of animals and humans. This shape is attributed to the presence of endospores that develop under conditions unfavorable for vegetative growth and distend single cells terminally or sub-terminally. Spores germinate under conditions favorable for vegetative growth, such as anaerobiosis and presence of organic substrates. It is believed that present day Mollicutes (Eubacteria) have evolved regressively (i.e., by genome reduction) from gram-positive clostridia-like ancestors with a low GC content in DNA. This organism produces one of the most potent and deadly neurotoxins known, a botulinum toxin that prevents the release of acetylcholine at the neuromuscular junction, thereby inhibiting muscle contraction and causing paralysis. In most cases the diseased person dies of asphyxiation as a result of paralysis of chest muscles involved in breathing. The spores are heat-resistant and can survive in inadequately heated, prepared, or processed foods. Spores germinate under favorable conditions (anaerobiosis and substrate-rich environment) and bacteria start propagating very rapidly, producing the toxin.Botulinum toxin, and C. botulinum cells, has been found in a wide variety of foods, including canned ones. Almost any food that has a high pH (above 4.6) can support growth of the bacterium. Honey is the most common vehicle for infection in infants. Food poisoning through C. botulinum is the most frequent type of infection caused by this bacterium. The wound botulism that occurs when C. botulinum infects an individual via an open wound is much rarer and is very similar to tetanus disease. There are several types of botulinum toxin known (type A through type F), all of them being neurotoxic polypeptides. The most common and widely distributed are strains and serovars of C. botulinum that produce type A toxin.




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Islands with an asterisk (*) contain ribosomal proteins or RNA related elements and may indicate a False Positive Prediction!

Subject IslandStartEndLengthSubject Host DescriptionE-valueBit scoreVisual BLASTNVisual BLASTP
NC_020291:11498871149887117209922213Clostridium saccharoperbutylacetonicum N1-4(HMT), complete genome1e-66262BLASTN svgBLASTP svg
NC_020291:57520995752099577709925001Clostridium saccharoperbutylacetonicum N1-4(HMT), complete genome4e-42180BLASTN svgBLASTP svg
NC_010674:14965001496500152566029161Clostridium botulinum B str. Eklund 17B, complete genome2e-31145BLASTN svgBLASTP svg
NC_020291:59810065981006600872727722Clostridium saccharoperbutylacetonicum N1-4(HMT), complete genome3e-21111BLASTN svgBLASTP svg
NC_010674:3581044*3581044360559924556Clostridium botulinum B str. Eklund 17B, complete genome4e-1797.6BLASTN svgBLASTP svg
NC_008261:29209992920999294008119083Clostridium perfringens ATCC 13124, complete genome2e-1695.6BLASTN svgBLASTP svg
NC_004557:2711702*2711702274444632745Clostridium tetani E88, complete genome3e-1591.7BLASTN svgBLASTP svg
NC_012225:22477962247796226763119836Brachyspira hyodysenteriae WA1, complete genome1e-1179.8BLASTN svgBLASTP svg
NC_010723:3499291*3499291352129922009Clostridium botulinum E3 str. Alaska E43, complete genome2e-1075.8BLASTN svgBLASTP svg
NC_014150:2055907*2055907207895323047Brachyspira murdochii DSM 12563 chromosome, complete genome1e-0869.9BLASTN svgBLASTP svg
NC_010723:28738862873886289437620491Clostridium botulinum E3 str. Alaska E43, complete genome2e-0765.9BLASTN svgBLASTP svg
NC_012225:1575432*1575432161284237411Brachyspira hyodysenteriae WA1, complete genome2e-0765.9BLASTN svgBLASTP svg
NC_018604:838932*83893286441725486Brachyspira pilosicoli WesB complete genome2e-0765.9BLASTN svgBLASTP svg
NC_003997:47450274745027476567320647Bacillus anthracis str. Ames, complete genome6e-0763.9BLASTN svgBLASTP svg
NC_005945:47477404747740476709919360Bacillus anthracis str. Sterne, complete genome6e-0763.9BLASTN svgBLASTP svg
NC_005957:47572154757215477853821324Bacillus thuringiensis serovar konkukian str. 97-27, complete6e-0763.9BLASTN svgBLASTP svg
NC_006274:48146014814601483509920499Bacillus cereus E33L, complete genome6e-0763.9BLASTN svgBLASTP svg
NC_007530:47448704744870476579920930Bacillus anthracis str. 'Ames Ancestor', complete genome6e-0763.9BLASTN svgBLASTP svg
NC_014335:46972934697293471572818436Bacillus cereus biovar anthracis str. CI chromosome, complete6e-0763.9BLASTN svgBLASTP svg
NC_020291:39000463900046392536225317Clostridium saccharoperbutylacetonicum N1-4(HMT), complete genome6e-0763.9BLASTN svgBLASTP svg
NC_019908:641321*64132166828426964Brachyspira pilosicoli P43/6/78 chromosome, complete genome2e-0661.9BLASTN svgBLASTP svg
NC_003909:47378824737882475869520814Bacillus cereus ATCC 10987, complete genome2e-0661.9BLASTN svgBLASTP svg
NC_014614:2333890*2333890235633822449Clostridium sticklandii, complete genome9e-0660BLASTN svgBLASTP svg
NC_014150:2088012*2088012212109933088Brachyspira murdochii DSM 12563 chromosome, complete genome9e-0660BLASTN svgBLASTP svg