Pre_GI: BLASTP Hits

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Query: NC_009698:2265475:2282289 Clostridium botulinum A str. Hall chromosome, complete genome

Start: 2282289, End: 2282648, Length: 360

Host Lineage: Clostridium botulinum; Clostridium; Clostridiaceae; Clostridiales; Firmicutes; Bacteria

General Information: Clostridium botulinum A strain Hall was received at Fort Detrick from Harvard University in 1947. The strain is presumably one from Dr. Ivan Hall's collection, but the exact strain number has been lost. This strain produces high amounts of type A toxin. Produces botulinum, one of the most potent toxins known. This genus comprises about 150 metabolically diverse species of anaerobes that are ubiquitous in virtually all anoxic habitats where organic compounds are present, including soils, aquatic sediments and the intestinal tracts of animals and humans. This shape is attributed to the presence of endospores that develop under conditions unfavorable for vegetative growth and distend single cells terminally or sub-terminally. Spores germinate under conditions favorable for vegetative growth, such as anaerobiosis and presence of organic substrates. It is believed that present day Mollicutes (Eubacteria) have evolved regressively (i.e., by genome reduction) from gram-positive clostridia-like ancestors with a low GC content in DNA. This organism produces one of the most potent and deadly neurotoxins known, a botulinum toxin that prevents the release of acetylcholine at the neuromuscular junction, thereby inhibiting muscle contraction and causing paralysis. In most cases the diseased person dies of asphyxiation as a result of paralysis of chest muscles involved in breathing. The spores are heat-resistant and can survive in inadequately heated, prepared, or processed foods. Spores germinate under favorable conditions (anaerobiosis and substrate-rich environment) and bacteria start propagating very rapidly, producing the toxin. Botulinum toxin, and C. botulinum cells, has been found in a wide variety of foods, including canned ones. Almost any food that has a high pH (above 4.6) can support growth of the bacterium.




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SubjectStartEndLengthSubject Host DescriptionCDS descriptionE-valueBit score
NC_014328:4073714:409796740979674098320354Clostridium ljungdahlii ATCC 49587 chromosome, complete genomeputative dinitrogenase iron-molybdenum cofactor biosynthesis protein6e-43172
NC_008593:640000:660579660579660932354Clostridium novyi NT, complete genomehypothetical protein3e-22103
NC_018870:2316499:237190023719002372268369Thermacetogenium phaeum DSM 12270 chromosome, complete genomedinitrogenase iron-molybdenum cofactor biosynthesis protein5e-1476.3
NC_017096:260333:278884278884279165282Caldisericum exile AZM16c01, complete genomehypothetical protein3e-1373.9
NC_007498:1848437:185162818516281851990363Pelobacter carbinolicus DSM 2380, complete genomehypothetical protein5e-1373.2
NC_012883:636560:647567647567648007441Thermococcus sibiricus MM 739, complete genomeIron-molybdenum cofactor-binding protein1e-1065.1
NC_015499:1640500:165849316584931658849357Thermodesulfobium narugense DSM 14796 chromosome, complete genomeDinitrogenase iron-molybdenum cofactor biosynthesis protein3e-1063.9
NC_016048:1390463:139385513938551394220366Oscillibacter valericigenes Sjm18-20, complete genomehypothetical protein2e-0960.8